Building beetle banks

Illustration of a beetle bank along row crops. Beetle not to scale!

Fight off pests and reduce weeds with one simple feature! Beetle banks are raised areas of earth that are planted with certain grasses to provide habitat for ground-dwelling beneficial insects. Beetle banks reduce pest pressure and the need for insecticides, while also helping suppress crop weeds!

Read on for easy instructions on how to build a beetle bank, or join us and our partners at the 2016 Farwest Show (Thursday, August 25th through Saturday the 27th) for a great informational display, complete with a beetle bank model! Read more

Register for a free workshop

Maidenhair fern (Adiantum aleuticum)

Our fall season of workshops is here! We offer free and practical how-to workshops at a variety of locations in collaboration with our community partners. Our workshops cover choosing the right native plants for your yard, natural landscaping techniques that reduce water use and pollution, supporting beneficial insects and pollinators, and putting rainwater to use with a rain garden!

Our workshops are free and open to everyone, but they fill up quickly – register for a workshop today!

View the workshop schedule and register here!

Want to get the latest workshop and event updates? Join our email list, or follow us on Facebook and Twitter for more frequent updates.

Construction begins August 1st to remove barriers to fish passage on Johnson Creek

Headwaters Farm culvert - 2014

Update: Construction has begun! Stay tuned for project updates in this post.

When the East Multnomah Soil and Water Conservation District purchased Headwaters Farm in Gresham five years ago, we saw it as an opportunity to do what we do best: promote clean water, healthy soil, and wildlife habitat. We quickly found a project on the property that addresses all three at once: replacing the culverts for safe fish passage.

The North Fork of Johnson Creek flows through three culverts on Headwaters Farm that are either old, undersized, or perched (a perched culvert is one where the outlet is higher than the downstream water surface). All three act as barriers to salmon as they swim upstream to lay their eggs. Read more

Our 2016-17 Work Plan

Gordon Creek Middlefalls

Our work plan for the 2016-17 fiscal year is now available! You can download the Annual Work Plan here.

The mission of the East Multnomah Soil and Water Conservation District is to help people care for land and water. Our vision is that our lands and waters are healthy and sustain farms, forests, wildlife and communities. Each year we create a work plan to organize and prioritize our work, and set specific program goals to further our mission and vision. The work plan is organized by the work in our four programmatic units: Finance and Operations (The Finance and Operations Program focuses on the administrative aspects of the EMSWCD’s work, including board and committee management, budgeting and financial management, contracting, human resources, office management, facilities management, and marketing and media.), Urban Lands (The Urban Lands Program provides workshops, project consultations, demonstration projects and public events, such as native landscaping tours and native plant sales.), Rural Lands (The Rural Lands Program focuses on providing advice to farmers and other land managers on best practices, improving riparian habitats, and eradicating invasive weeds.), and Conservation Legacy (The Conservation Legacy Program focuses on helping new farmers get established, on protecting and restoring agricultural, natural resource, and access to nature lands as well as providing funding for partners and allies for conservation-related activities.).

You can also learn more about EMSWCD and the work we do in the District in the About EMSWCD section. Contact us at (503) 222-7645 or info@emswcd.org to find out how we can help you care for land and water.

Entering a new strategic partnership with the Columbia Slough, Johnson Creek and Sandy River Basin Watershed Councils

Jay Udelhoven and all three Watershed Council Executive Directors sign the SPA agreement.

We are proud to announce the launch of a new long-term partnership with the Columbia Slough Watershed Council, the Johnson Creek Watershed Council, and the Sandy River Basin Watershed Council! Under this five-year Strategic Partnership Agreement (SPA), we will work together with the watershed councils to plan for and implement joint conservation projects within our service area (all of Multnomah County east of the Willamette River). The partnership will include grant funding up to $1.5 million from EMSWCD to the watershed councils as well as joint fund-raising from other sources.

Find out more about the partnership and initial project funding here.

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