Category Archives: Nature Notes

Nature Notes 4: Native Plant Gallery

Welcome to EMSWCD’s Nature Notes series! Nature Notes shares small moments and interesting observations from our property, as well as related natural history tidbits, on a weekly to monthly basis.

May 23rd, 2018

May is Native Plant Month!

This month in celebration of Native Plant Month, we’re highlighting a variety of native plants, all of which you can come see any time at our Conservation Corner!

May is Native Plant Month in Portland for good reason — everything is blooming in all the colors of the rainbow. Check out these beauties in our gallery below, or come explore our grounds and see all these and more in person! Read more

Nature Notes 3: May is Native Plant Month!

Welcome to EMSWCD’s Nature Notes series! Nature Notes shares small moments and interesting observations from our property, as well as related natural history tidbits, on a weekly to monthly basis.

May 7th, 2018

May is Native Plant Month!

This month in celebration of Native Plant Month, we’ll be highlighting a variety of native plants, all of which you can come see any time at our Conservation Corner!

This week we’re seeing purple everywhere with common camas, Henderson’s shooting star, Menzie’s larkspur, and Oregon Iris in full bloom. Read more

Nature Notes – March 27th, 2018

Kinnikinnick (Arctostaphylos uva-ursi)

Welcome to EMSWCD’s Nature Notes series! Nature Notes shares small moments and interesting observations from our property, as well as related natural history tidbits, on a weekly to monthly basis.

March 27th, 2018

Early spring bloomers!

Right now the non-native cherry trees, forsythia, and daffodils are dazzling us with their showy displays, but many other native species are blooming as well, such as kinnickinnick, trilliums, and bleeding heart.

Kinnickinnick is an evergreen, drought-tolerant, low-growing native shrub that is an excellent groundcover for tough spots such as parking strips. Its small pink flowers are not showy, but are important sources of food in early spring for pollinators like bumblebees, syrphid flies, and mason bees. White trilliums are long-lived herbaceous perennials of the forest floor; many do not bloom until they are seven years old! They are mostly pollinated by moths, beetles, and bumblebees. Dicentra, or bleeding-heart, is another long-lived understory perennial. Its delicate pink flower is an important spring necter source for hummingbirds.

Flowers that bloom early in the spring and late in the fall are very important to wildlife, so the longer you have flowers blooming, the prettier your yard will be for wildlife as well as for humans!

Nature Notes – March 1st, 2018

Welcome to EMSWCD’s Nature Notes series!

When EMSWCD purchased this property for our office, the yard consisted of a weed-filled lawn with a few trees. Our staff kept the trees, removed all the grass, and began landscaping and installing hundreds of native plants. Every year since then we’ve continued to add plants and make adjustments as needed, and the landscape is now totally transformed!

In our new Nature Notes series, we’ll share small moments and interesting observations from our property, as well as related natural history tidbits, on a weekly to monthly basis. It’s important to us to be present on the landscape, to really see the world we move through every day—both its changes and its consistency. The more aware we become of the natural world around us, and of how plants and animals interact, the better we can help people care for land and water. Read more